Refine Results

$9.99
No office can function without a little humor and craziness. Adams turns mundane office issues into excruciatingly funny office moments. In Freedom's Just Another Word for People Finding Out You're Useless, fans get a hilarious collection of great Dilbert strips that are anything but useless. From office politics and reams of red tape, to mayhem due to new technologies and, of course, the crazy cast of co-workers, Dilbert gets it done. DILBERT © 2012 by Scott Adams, Inc. All rights reserved. Licensed by Peanuts Worldwide, Inc.
→ more

$9.99
Does Dilbert creator Scott Adams have a hidden camera in your office--or is he just completely in tune with the inept managers, wacky office politics, and nonsensical leadership practices that seem to run wild at your company? Stop looking for the camera. Dilbert has become a hugely successful strip because Adams feels your pain. How? Because this former employee of a major telecommunications company has been there. He's seen the road to failure firsthand. And he knows that to successfully navigate the ludicrous world of business, you can't expect common sense to prevail, you need to keep a sense of humor, and above all, you must always be ready to blame the other guy. The strip's enormous popularity stems from the fact that its millions of readers easily identify with the crazy plots and wacky characters found within the corporate environment. Sure, most companies don't have a bespectacled engineer with a tie permanently curled up, a cynical talking dog, and a manager with two pointy tufts of hair. But it's the outrageous things Dilbert characters do and say that leave readers knowingly nodding their heads and, of course, laughing uproariously. The antics of Dilbert's cast are based not only on Adams's own corporate experiences, but on the numerous e-mails he receives each day about the office dramas of his devoted fans.
→ more

$9.99
For more than 20 years, Scott Adams's Dilbert has chronicled the problem-filled work world of pointless projects, questionable employment practices, and interoffice politics that eerily resemble our own 9-to-5 cubicle existence. In How's That Underling Thing Working Out for You?, Adams takes on the challenges of Elbonian sensitivity training, employee satisfaction surveys, confusopoly consultants, and more inside this new Dilbert book. If you agree that every indeterminable project has to have at least one WDG (Worthless Dumb Guy), or are subjected to results-free sensitivity training, questionable employee surveys, and freelance consultants that seem to offer little more than exorbitant invoices, then chances are you find the corporate cubicle culture philosophy represented inside How's That Underling Thing Working Out for You? alive and well inside your own work environment--and that's exactly what makes Dilbert one of the most successful and popular comic strips of all time. From Dogbert's invention of a beheading app to Dilbert's PowerPoint presentation that proves two monkeys could lead better than current management, How's That Underling Thing Working Out for You? chronicles corporate cubicle culture questionable training seminars and employee satisfaction surveys, along with made-up consultancies one Dilbert strip at a time. DILBERT © 2012 by Scott Adams, Inc. All rights reserved. Licensed by Peanuts Worldwide, Inc.
→ more

$9.99
Whether avoiding pointless meetings with the clueless pointy-haired boss or angsting over insanely impossible sales goals, meaningless performance objectives, and a mind-numbing cubicle environment, Dilbert and his fellow corporate victims soldier on, providing a great humorous release for the great brotherhood of office drones. For more than 20 years, Dilbert has connected with the great unappreciated, making one and all wonder, "Has Scott Adams bugged our offices?" In I Can't Remember If We're Cheap or Smart, Scott once again demonstrates that through the dot-coms to the mortgage bubble burst to the new normal, Dilbert knows that the stuff of work is really funny business! DILBERT © 2012 by Scott Adams, Inc. All rights reserved. Licensed by Peanuts Worldwide, Inc.
→ more

$9.99
The boss. Everyone has one, and all of every boss's worst traits are embodied in The Boss in Dilbert. In I Sense a Coldness to Your Mentoring, the ongoing torture that The Boss wreaks on his helpless underlings is played out in full. From a total lack of mentoring skills to clueless budget requests and pointless, mind-numbing endless meetings, The Boss makes office life for Dilbert, Wally, Alice, and his secretary a living hell with cubicle walls.
→ more

$9.99
What do the arts of yoga, feng shui, and Irish dance have in common? They can't save you from a gnawing dissatisfaction with your job. Luckily, our favorite office cog has a few tricks up his sleeve. Armed with a wearable brain stimulator and ingestible nanorobots, Dilbert discovers how to outpace stress, boredom, and sitting-induced early death. He may be a cyborg with a fake personality, but meetings are more tolerable than ever
→ more

$9.99
Read by 150 million fans in 39 countries, Dilbert concerns the exploits of a cynical engineer who tries to stay afloat in the turbulence that is corporate America in the 1990s. This latest collection of cartoons from the enormously popular strip is aimed at the insanity of the business world. Dilbert is the ultimate parody of corporate America. This latest collection finds our unlikely hero up to the uneven knot in his bent tie in the callow idiocy of (what else?) the business world. DILBERT © 2012 by Scott Adams, Inc. All rights reserved. Licensed by Peanuts Worldwide, Inc.
→ more

$9.99
Following his 20th anniversary hit, Dilbert 2.0, Scott Adams returns with another Dilbert collection of funny page favorites inside I'm Tempted to Stop Acting Randomly. Inside this collection, Dilbert and his team "flail around in futility" while the corporate bosses "forget what it's like to be one of the little people." From CEO Dogbert's speculative use of the company jet for personal vacationing to the flawed planning of a new electrically compromised data center, Dilbert exemplifies the randomness and annoyances associated with corporate cubicle culture. DILBERT © 2012 by Scott Adams, Inc. All rights reserved. Licensed by Peanuts Worldwide, Inc.
→ more

$9.99
Office workers, cubicle squatters, and corporate drones everywhere read Dilbert in their morning papers and see their own bosses and coworkers in the frames of the strip, enacting on newsprint the weird rituals and bizarre activities that are conducted each day in the American workplace. The characters' names and hairstyles have been changed to protect their identities, but Dilbert's readers aren't fooled. After all, they spend every day with these idiots and lunatics. Jargon-spewing corporate zombies. The sociopath who checks voice mail on his speaker phone. The fascist information systems guy. The sadistic human resources director. The technophobic vice president. The power-mad executive assistant. The pursed-lip sycophant. The big stubborn dumb guy. They're Dilbert's coworkers, and chances are they're yours, too. If you know them, work with them, or dialogue with them about leveraging synergies to maximize shareholder value, then you'll recognize this comic strip as a day at the office, only funnier! Since 1989 Dilbert has lampooned not only the people but also the accepted conventions and practices of the business world. Office politics, management trends, business travel, personnel policies, corporate bureaucracy, irrational strategies, unfathomable accounting practices, unproductive meetings, dysfunctional organizations, oppressive work spaces, silly protocols, and inscrutable jargon are all targets of Adams's darkly goofy satirical pen. Dilbert strikes a deeply resonant chord with fans because it casts such a dead-on reflection of the realities of the white-collar workplace, even with its off-the-wall delivery. It's Not Funny If I Have to Explain It, features Adams's personal all-time favorite selections, along with his own handwritten commentary about the strips. DILBERT © 2012 by Scott Adams, Inc. All rights reserved. Licensed by Peanuts Worldwide, Inc.
→ more

$9.99
"Since Adams parted company with Pacific Bell in 1995, the business he has built out of mocking business has turned into the sort of success story that the average cartoon hero could only dream of."--The London Financial Times "Go ahead and cut that Dilbert cartoon. Pin it to the wall of your claustrophobic cubicle. Laugh at it around the water cooler, remarking how similar it is to the incomprehensible memos and ludicrous management strategies at your own company."--The Washington Post Dilbert, Dogbert, and the rest of the world's favorite cubicle dwellers are sure to leave you rolling in your workspace with Scott Adams's cartoon collection, Journey to Cubeville. Dilbert creator Scott Adams has something special for everyone who thinks their workplace is a living monument to inefficiency--or, for those who have been led to believe unnecessary work is like popcorn for the soul. Adams lampoons everything in the business world that drives the sane worker into the land of the lunacy: *Network administrators who have the power to paralyze an entire business with a mere keystroke *Accountants who force you to battle ferociously to get reimbursed for a $2.59 ham sandwich you scarfed while traveling *Managers obsessed with perfect-attendance certificates, dead-end projects, and blocking employees from fun web sites and decent office supplies *Companies spending piles of dough on projects deeply rooted in stupidity, as well as a myriad of stupid consultants
→ more

$9.99
Dilbert, the cubicle-dwelling drone, is at his satirical best with this new collection of cartoons. Dilbert has managed to keep up with technology like iPads and Twitter over the years, as well as advanced systems like the Disaster Preparedness Plan that has its followers eating the crumbs from their keyboards. It doesn't get any more sophisticated than that. It's an office code violation to be this good after so many years, but Dilbert keeps doing what he does best: passive-aggressively out-witting his superiors and exercising conflict avoidance. And he is so good. No wonder office drones and workforce automatons alike can't resist the cold embrace of Dilbert's workplace.
→ more

$9.99
"Today I had a choice of doing something important that no one would ever realize . . . or doing something that would look like an accomplishment. So I attended meetings until I could no longer appreciate the difference." -Dilbert Dilbert appears in 2,500 newspapers in 65 countries and is translated into 19 languages for more than 150 million fans. Proving that corporate CEOs are indeed clueless, that PowerPoint presentations are at best perfunctory, and that the Office Nemesis is an omnipresent force to be reckoned with, Dilbert creator Scott Adams offers his 29th comic compilation all in four-color-collecting all cartoons published from June 19, 2006, through March 31, 2007. Dilbert continues to be the voice for the embattled cubicle-dwelling Everyman. With best-friend Dogbert, and a veritable who's who in accompanying office characters ranging from the Boss and Wally to Alice and Catbert, Dilbert offers a reflective critique of corporate. DILBERT © 2012 by Scott Adams, Inc. All rights reserved. Licensed by Peanuts Worldwide, Inc.
→ more

$9.99
In Problem Identified: And You're Probably Not Part of the Solution, cartoonist Scott Adams affectionately ridicules inept office colleagues--those co-workers behind the pointless projects, interminable meetings, and ill-conceived "downsizings"--in this thematically linked collection of Dilbert comic strips. Dilbert, the benchmark of office humors, continues to use its considerable powers of humor for the greater good, helping us to fight the good fight at work despite those around us whose job descriptions seem to include undercutting morale and generally doing everything possible to lead us into economic ruin. DILBERT © 2012 by Scott Adams, Inc. All rights reserved. Licensed by Peanuts Worldwide, Inc.
→ more

$9.99
In Random Acts of Management, cartoonist Scott Adams offers sardonic glimpses once again into the lunatic office life of Dilbert, Dogbert, Wally, and others, as they work in an all-too-believably ludicrous setting filled with incompetent management, incomprehensible project acronyms, and minuscule raises. Everyone, it seems, identifies with Dilbert, who struggles to navigate the constant tribulations of absurd company policies and idiot management strategies. DILBERT © 2012 by Scott Adams, Inc. All rights reserved. Licensed by Peanuts Worldwide, Inc.
→ more

$9.99
He's the icon of millions of corporate workers, the most popular cubicle dweller on this planet. He spends his days in endless meetings with incompetent supervisors, performing perfunctory tasks mixed with the occasional team-building, brainstorming, or management fad-of-the-day session. He has entertained us for more than two decades: He's Dilbert. Created in 1989 by Adams, in his own cubicle as a doodle distraction, Dilbert has found a home in the workplace, this generation's home away from home. Adams amuses readers with his portrayal of the absurdities of this environment with unfailing accuracy and precision. As readers of more than 2,000 newspapers, millions of books, and the newly revamped Dilbert.com site know, the familiar mouthless character with the upturned tie, his dog, Dogbert, the pointy-haired Boss, over-achieving Alice and underachieving Wally, Human Resources director Catbert, depict a world that's all too easy to recognize, complete with shrinking cubicles, clueless co-workers, focus groups and ill-conceived management concepts. In this all-new chronological collection, Adams further exploits the fodder of workaday life, making even the most cynical cubicle dweller laugh at our shared, absurd work lives. DILBERT © 2012 by Scott Adams, Inc. All rights reserved. Licensed by Peanuts Worldwide, Inc.
→ more

$9.99
"Ninety percent of ethics is picking the right ethicist." -Dilbert Scott Adams offers up his this Dilbert collection exploring themes of sloth and corporate indifference. The arbitrary, unspoken rules of interoffice emailing, the random policy generator, and the knowledge that management has indeed given up ever trying to win an award for best place to work all combine to make life in the Dilbert workplace as demoralizing as real life. Dilbert navigates through the same corporate 9 to 5 existence in which his readers physically dwell. Dilbert, Dogbert, the boss, Wally, Alice, and Catbert tackle corporate indolence, avarice, and pretense one strip at a time, from the neighboring cubicle whistler to the project naysayer to the guy who's always just too busy to lend a hand. DILBERT © 2012 by Scott Adams, Inc. All rights reserved. Licensed by Peanuts Worldwide, Inc.
→ more

$9.99
"I think that idiot bosses are timeless, and as long as there are annoying people in the world, I won't run out of material."--Scott Adams Dilbert and the gang are back for this 26th collection, Thriving on Vague Objectives. Adams has his finger on the pulse of cubicle dwellers across the globe. No one delivers more laughs or captures the reality of the 9 to 5 worker better than Dilbert, Dogbert, Catbert, and a cast of stupefying office stereotypes--which is why there are millions of fans of the Dilbert comic strip. Dilbert is a techno-man stuck in a dead-end job (sound familiar?). Power-mad Dogbert strives to take over the world and enslave the humans. The most intelligent person in Dilbert's world is his trash collector, who knows everything about everything. Artist and creator Scott Adams started Dilbert as a doodle when he worked as a bank teller. He continued doodling when he was upgraded to a cubicle for a major telecommunications company. His boss (no telling if he was pointy-haired or not) suggested the name Dilbert. Adams is so dead-on accurate in his depictions of office life that he has been accused of spying on Corporate America. DILBERT © 2012 by Scott Adams, Inc. All rights reserved. Licensed by Peanuts Worldwide, Inc.
→ more

$9.99
"It's an embarrassment of riches. I feel like an undertaker who just heard about a bus accident. It's tragic, but good for business."---Scott Adams Maybe, just maybe, the reason Scott Adams is able to so completely and utterly skewer the absurdities of the modern workplace is that deep down he really enjoyed his many years as a cubicle dweller. Perhaps his comic strip Dilbert is nothing more than a cleverly disguised 17-year-long love letter to corporate America. And maybe, just maybe, monkeys will fly out of Donald Trump's butt. In Try Rebooting Yourself, AMP's 28th Dilbert collection, the world's most dysfunctional office family is back and doing what it does best. Wally adroitly steers clear of new assignments-and perfects his "work grimace." The Pointy-Haired Boss (PHB) thinks of new ways to demoralize and disenfranchise his employees. (As part of a new strategy to make the pension plan solvent, he reminds employees "Smoking is cool.") Dogbert continues his lucrative consulting business. And Dilbert, alas, he soldiers and smolders on, searching for intelligent life in the corporate universe-and maybe, just maybe, a little action. (Fat chance.) This time out, the gang is joined by a host of odd (but strangely familiar) guest characters including the clueless Hammerhead Bob, and Petricia, the PHB's fawning but ferocious sycophant. All office workers may now nod knowingly. DILBERT © 2012 by Scott Adams, Inc. All rights reserved. Licensed by Peanuts Worldwide, Inc.
→ more

$9.99
"Once every decade, America is gifted with an angst-ridden anti-hero, a Nietzschean nebbish, an us-against-the-universe everyperson around whom our insecurities collect like iron shavings to a magnet. Charlie Chaplin. Dagwood Bumstead. Charlie Brown. Cathy. Now, Dilbert." -The Miami Herald The former occupant of cubicle 4S700R at Pacific Bell seems to have made a go of this cartoon strip thing. What began as a doodling diversion that Scott Adams shared with his officemates has exploded into one of the most read cartoon strips worldwide. This Dilbert treasury, What Do You Call a Sociopath in a Cubicle? Answer: A Coworker, brings together all of the office psychos who have annoyed Dilbert and entertained millions. This compilation pays homage to some of the most annoying and outrageous characters Adams' has ever drawn-characters he likes to call office "sociopaths." * Edfred the two-faced man * Anne L. Retentive * Nervous Ted * Loud Howard * Alice and her fist of death This full-color treasury reinforces everything that makes the strip great by lampooning the people and processes of business. Adams homes in on all the quirky coworkers that drive us crazy in the corporate world. He has fun at the expense of office oafs found in workplaces everywhere-creatures like the Office Sociopath, who listens to voice mail on his speaker phone, and the Exactly Man, who punctuates everything with a finger point, exclaiming "Exactly!" The result is a book that leaves readers knowingly rolling their eyes and, of course, laughing uproariously.
→ more

$9.99
What would the world of work be like without Dilbert? Downright insufferable! When it became syndicated in 1989, Dilbert struck a nerve with workers everywhere. Through its frames they saw life on the job as they knew it, with all the absurdity, craziness, and dry humor that underlies any living, breathing organization. The fact that the strip focused on a hapless engineer and his cynical dog just made it all the more funny. Now work life seems downright unimaginable without Dilbert and Dogbert's take on everything from management ill-practices to nonperformance reviews. What Would Wally Do?, delivers that same combination of pain and humor that readers count on. This collection especially highlights Wally, Dilbert's colleague, fellow engineer, foil, and fool. Wally's that short quirky guy with little hair, plenty of horn-rimmed frames, and almost zero work ethic. After all, who's got time for a job, thinks the self-proclaimed "Lord Wally the Puppet Master," when you're busy surviving the "Mobility Pool," turning your cubicle into a tourist attraction called "Sticky-Note City," and selecting a mail-order bride from Elbonia? Weasel-Boy makes a point of highlighting his poor performance and lack of respect . . .and usually gets another raise for his efforts. Such is life in Dilbert and Wally's world. Such are the laughs in What Would Wally Do? DILBERT © 2012 by Scott Adams, Inc. All rights reserved. Licensed by Peanuts Worldwide, Inc.
→ more

$9.99
Dilbert is easily one of the most clever and consistently funny comics in current circulation. Like all great comic strips, it provides a much-needed daily dose of comedy and, most importantly, keeps its finger firmly planted on the pulse of truth while doing so. Some might think that the corporate scandals of 2002 could make it difficult to find anything funny about today's business world. But When Body Language Goes Bad proves it will take more than that to slow down the inventive wit of Scott Adams, who clearly is never at a loss for finding hysterical things to mock in corporate life. This marks the 21st collection of Adams' wildly popular comic strip, Dilbert, which is featured in more than 2,000 newspapers worldwide. This book updates loyal readers on the so-called careers of Dilbert, Alice, Wally, Asok the intern, and other regulars as they wallow through pointless projects, mismanaged company takeovers, futile team-building exercises, and other inane company initiatives like the "name the rest room" contest. In addition to the strips' familiar characters, this collection showcases Adams' masterful ability to create hilarious "guest stars." There's the network design engineer known as Psycho Hillbilly, who was going for the gentle biker look until he decided it was overdone. Then, there's M. T. Suit, who is merely an empty suit walking the office halls spewing corporatese, such as "promising to enhance core competencies by leveraging platforms." Adams says that about 80 percent of his initial ideas come from his 150 million-plus readers. Those worldwide readers are sure to celebrate the humor found in When Body Language Goes Bad, his latest satirical look at the modern workplace. DILBERT © 2012 by Scott Adams, Inc. All rights reserved. Licensed by Peanuts Worldwide, Inc.
→ more

$9.99
Scott Adams still has the corporate world guffawing about the adventures of nerdy Dilbert and his power-hungry companion, Dogbert, plus Ratbert and the pointy-haired boss, as they make their way through the travails of modern work life. Only a cartoonist with been-there-endured-that experience could make us laugh so hard. When Did Ignorance Become a Point of View? captures it all, even those Sunday strips that make it into the office each Monday morning. DILBERT © 2012 by Scott Adams, Inc. All rights reserved. Licensed by Peanuts Worldwide, Inc.
→ more

$9.99
Confined to their cubicles in a company run by idiot bosses, Dilbert and his white-collar colleagues make the dronelike world of Kafka seem congenial. Parasitic consultants, weaselly stockbrokers, masochistic coworkers and the ever-present, evil-plotting pointy-haired boss? Welcome to the seventh circle of hell, er, the 22nd collection of Scott Adams' stupendously popular comic strip, Dilbert! Words You Don't Want to Hear During Your Annual Performance Review updates loyal readers on the mind-numbing careers of Dilbert, Wally, Alice, the PHB himself, and an ever-expanding cast of walk-on "guest stars." In this installment, a cash-sucking "consultick" burrows under the boss's skin, a not-so-grim reaper pops anti-depressants, and a lab accident turns Dilbert into a sheep-a transformation which goes barely noticed by his beleaguered coworkers. All the while, Adams takes his patented over-the-top but right-on-the-money jabs at the inanity of the corporate world. Dilbert's fans are legion and loyal. They have purchased seven million cartoon collection books and counting. The Dilbert comic strip appears in 2,000 newspapers and in 65 countries in 19 languages. DILBERT © 2012 by Scott Adams, Inc. All rights reserved. Licensed by Peanuts Worldwide, Inc.
→ more

$9.99
Inside Your Accomplishments Are Suspiciously Hard to Verify, Adams tackles the subjects of Elbonian slave labor, faulty product recalls, less-than-anonymous employee surveys, and more. If you've ever looked among your co-workers and thought, "I hope feral cats eat every one of you," or briefly celebrated a well-deserved promotion only to realize that the word "promotion" now means that you're responsible for doing two jobs for the price of one, then chances are you find the corporate cubicle culture represented inside Dilbert alive and well inside your own work environment--and that's exactly what makes Dilbert so topical and funny. From Dilbert's invention of a portable brain scanner (with a popcorn microwave option) to his moonlighting as a professional corporate crime scene cleaner, Your Accomplishments Are Suspiciously Hard to Verify chronicles pointless projects, interminable meetings, and ill-conceived office policies one Dilbert strip at a time. DILBERT © 2012 by Scott Adams, Inc. All rights reserved. Licensed by Peanuts Worldwide, Inc.
→ more

$9.99
As fresh a look at the inanity of office life as it brought to the comics pages when it first appeared in 1989, this 40th AMP Dilbert collection comically confirms to the working public that we all really know what's going on. Our devices might be more sophisticated, our software and apps might be more plentiful, but when it gets down to interactions between the worker bees and the clueless in-controls, discontent and sarcasm rule, as only Dilbert can proclaim.
→ more

$9.99
We're talking cute, but with a Calvin and Hobbes-ian twist." --Mike Wilson, features editor, St. Petersburg Times In the spirit of Snoopy and Charlie Brown, or Calvin and Hobbes, please welcome Sophie and Doug. Dog Eat Doug is the cartooning creation of Brian Anderson that follows the daily exploits of Sophie, a cheese-loving chocolate Lab with a nose for the nuances of sarcasm and irony, and baby Doug, a healthy, happy newborn with no concept of jealousy and a limitless curiosity. Together, this dynamic duo adjusts to sharing the spotlight, the toys, and the affections of Mom and Dad, while exploring nature and its majesty, the couch and its cushions, and the cookie jar and its contents. As the first Dog Eat Doug collection, this book features 43 weeks' worth of strips beginning with the cartoon's 2005 debut.
→ more

$14.99
Created by the team that brought you The Complete Far Side and The Complete Calvin and Hobbes, the massive anthology 40 marks Doonesbury’s 40th anniversary by examining in depth the characters that have given the strip such vitality. This first volume of the four-volume e-book edition of 40 covers the years 1970 to 1979 for the celebrated cartoon strip. © 2012 G.B. Trudeau
→ more

$14.99
Created by the team that brought you The Complete Far Side and The Complete Calvin and Hobbes, the massive anthology 40 marks Doonesbury’s 40th anniversary by examining in depth the characters that have given the strip such vitality. This first volume of the four-volume e-book edition of 40 covers the years 1980 to 1989 for the celebrated cartoon strip. © 2012 G.B. Trudeau
→ more

$14.99
Created by the team that brought you The Complete Far Side and The Complete Calvin and Hobbes, the massive anthology 40 marks Doonesbury’s 40th anniversary by examining in depth the characters that have given the strip such vitality. This first volume of the four-volume e-book edition of 40 covers the years 1990 to 1999 for the celebrated cartoon strip. © 2012 G.B. Trudeau
→ more

$14.99
Created by the team that brought you The Complete Far Side and The Complete Calvin and Hobbes, the massive anthology 40 marks Doonesbury’s 40th anniversary by examining in depth the characters that have given the strip such vitality. This first volume of the four-volume e-book edition of 40 covers the years 2000 to 2009 for the celebrated cartoon strip. © 2012 G.B. Trudeau
→ more

$9.99
From the Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist whose acclaimed Yuge!: 30 Years of Doonesbury on Trump blew up the bestseller list, comes the sequel millions prayed would be unnecessary. #SAD!: Doonesbury in the Time of Trump tracks the shocking victory, the inept transition, and the tumultuous eternity of POTUS's First 500 Days.Citizens who rise every morning in dread, braced for disruptive, Randomly Capitalized, atrociously grammarized, horrably speld, toxic tweeting from the Oval Office, can curl up at night with this clarifying collection of hot takes  on the First Sociopath, his enablers, and their appalling legacy. Whether resisting or just persisting, readers will find G.B. Trudeau's cartoons are just the thing to ease the pain of remorse ("Could I have done more to prevent this?") and give them a shot at a few hours of unfitful sleep.There are worse things to spend your tax cut on. 
→ more

$9.99
Actual events may provide plenty of grist for the cartoon mill, but it takes a mind like Garry Trudeau's to sift through it for the hilarious kernel of truth. From the Bill Clinton-Ken Starr face-off to high-flying Internet start-ups to new ways to plagiarize term papers, Trudeau hones in on the things we take so seriously and livens them up with craftyjolts of jocularity. In this Doonesbury collection, Buck Wild Doonesbury, Trudeau is at his best. We watch as Uncle Bernie pulls the plug on Mike and Kim's entrepreneurial venture, the virtual company that follows that rich tradition of losing money and lots of it. We sit in on a press conference with America's most famous special prosecutor who admits he spent four years "Leaking. Trolling. It's been hectic." And we behold Zonker as he passes along his long-held slacker philosophy to his young nephew Zipper. Through it all, Doonesbury retains its fresh and innovative style. Doonesbury has, over the years, tweaked everything and nearly everyone, from Donald Trump's aggressive real estate style to Dan Quayle's unblinking stance on family values to Newt Gingrich's ticking-time-bomb technique, while keeping us entertained with characters including Boopsie, Duke, J.J., B.D., and Earl. Buck Wild Doonesbury, like the strip, is provocative, controversial, and hilarious. © 2012 G.B. Trudeau
→ more

$9.99
This breathtaking volume boldly, cheerfully, and blankly stares back across the stunningly mellow life and times of Zonker Harris. From his Californian-American roots to his legendary status as surfer, nanny, and former sun god, his career trajectory has unfailingly carried him ever deeper into the homegrown heart of the American daydream. A puddle-plumbing denizen of Walden Commune, Harris spent his formative years as a bodaciously freaked-out college student. His innovative decoding of the rites and rituals of the burgeoning counterculture put him on the cover of Time. Forced by a strategic oversight to graduate from college, Harris blazed a path to glory on the pro tanning circuit. His triumph in the George Hamilton Cocoa-Butter Open set a high watermark for the sport. Family values led Harris to devote considerable time to helping his stunned parents refill their empty nest. Extended-family values propelled him into a career as a professional nanny, in which capacity he has indeed taught the children well--especially Sam, who was surfing the long board while still in diapers. Later, leveraging his political cluelessness, Zonker served on the disastrous Duke2000 presidential campaign. A devoted foot soldier in the war against AIDS suffering, Zonk is held in high regard among SoCal's medical marijuana community for the efficacious potency of his magic brownies. Unfazed by worldly success, he remains a true and gentle freak. After all, he humbly notes, I am but one dude. © 2012 G.B. Trudeau
→ more

$9.99
Doonesbury continues to entertain, inspire, and provoke with its unique blend of social commentary, humor, and political satire. Chronicling the millennial state of the nation through the interconnected lives of its large cast of characters, the strip offers unusual perspectives on the usual suspects, and asks impertinent questions on the pertinent subjects of the day. In Duke 2000: Whatever It Takes Trudeau's Pulitzer Prize-winning strip tracks the end of an Internet start-up and the beginning of a gay marriage, the revival of an aging rocker's career -- and the complete reinvention of the irrepressible Uncle Duke. In a presidential primary campaign attracting the likes of Warren Beatty and Donald Trump, perhaps it was not surprising that the former ambassador to China decided to throw his bandana into the ring. © 2012 G.B. Trudeau
→ more

$9.99
"Rear Admiral Steve Kunkle, commander of the carrier strike force, grimaced at a Doonesbury comic strip from the Japan Times. It showed a Navy pilot thinking 'Oops!'" As Doonesbury shifts to a wartime footing, the strip's major players find themselves pre-positioned for the coming cakewalk. Weekend warrior B.D. leaves the Fighting Swooshes of Walden in the care of acting Coach Boopstein, returning to the sands of Kuwait as Camp Blowback's Public Affairs Officer. Among his charges: Roland Hedley, veteran of a grueling combat training program designed to keep media folk from getting capped. Offshore, the irrepressible Morale Officer Lieutenant. Tripler goes live ("Good MORNING, regime-changers!") to lift the shipbound spirits of his pre-swarthy charges, while offstage, Viceroy-in-Waiting Duke prepares to answer empire's call. Stateside, Mike takes up a flanking position on the sofa to log some serious CNN time, while the Reverend Sloan girds his loins for peace: "Look for us on TV-we'll be a million strong." Marching to the beat of a different cause, Zonker's old surfing mentor tries to enlist Z in a desperate fight to liberate Left Coastal access. Protests Zonk, "What can I do? I am but one dude!" Meanwhile, Jeff Redfern is but one CIA intern, yet he manages to launch a Predator drone and, using basic Nintendo training, knock out an Al-Q ammo dump. Also taking a hit, Trent Lott, busted for giving props to segregation. "I was trying to say I was down with the hood!" he backpedals, realizing too late that Mr. James Crow has finally left the house. With Alex declaring eco-jihad on SUVs, and Elmont launching a daily assault on coherence as on-line blogger "Jenny McTagart, Girl Pirate," it's hard to see a peaceful world ahead. But Jimmy Thudpucker can. Waging war on the recording industry, he and other filesharers have a vision of ultimate change de regime: "The suits die off, and Pepperland will be free again."
→ more

$9.99
Mike's summer daydream may be the only place we'll ever hear a thorough mea culpa from Dubya. But while mistakes have been made, lessons have been learned, even in the White House, where the Abramoff scandal inspires an official Ethics Refresher Course: "Right, good. Wrong, bad." The president seeks to clarify: "Invasions are still okay, though. Right?" And through these troubled times, how does 43 sleep at night? Alas, not well. "It's the stem cells. I hear their cries." Heckuva job. Roland's ubiquitous epaulets have recently come home from Rummyworld, "that vast, tumultuous terrorist theme park that used to be known as Iraq." At its chaotic outer edges, in al-Amok, Proconsul Duke survives numerous assassination attempts and the alleged courting of his sidekick by Iraqi suitors. But the serious new action is in New Orleans ("Looting, graft, profiteering -- it's all about the skill set, Honey") and Team Duke, like Halliburton, embarks for the Golf Coast, and sets up a command post on a FEMA-provided cruise ship. Elsewhere on the home front a fully-prostheticized B.D. is increasingly ambulatory, yet finds the struggle to reclaim his mind and emotions is by far the harder part of his journey. The collateral casualty count continues to rise as Zonker is forced to make a traumatic foray into the job market. © 2012 G.B. Trudeau
→ more

$9.99
On a road outside Fallujah, an RPG blows apart a Humvee and upends the life of a former football star. As a medevac chopper swoops down, the wounded Guardsman hears "Not your time, bro. Not today," and his remarkable healing journey begins. Thousands of U.S. soldiers have suffered grievous wounds in Iraq, but only one of them is a Doonesbury character. The Long Road Home: One Step at a Time chronicles seven months of cutting-edge cartooning, during which B.D.-and readers of the strip-got an up-close schooling in a kind of personal transformation no one seeks. Deprived not only of leg but also his ubiquitous trademark helmet, B.D. survives first-response Baghdad triage, evacuation to Landstuhl's surgeon-rich environment, and visits by innumerable morale-boosting celebs, both red and blue in hue. He's awed in turn by morphine, take-no-guff nurses, his fellow amps, and his family, including the daughter who hand-delivers succor, one aspirin at a time. Transferred stateside to Walter Reed's Ward 57, B.D. is inspired by the wisdom of physiatrists, warmed by the dedicated ministrations of real-life fellow-amp heroes like Jim the Milkshake Man, and dazzled by high-tech prostheses that cost more than luxury cars. He's annoyed by his own bouts with self-pity, by the bedside awkwardness of friends more comfortable regarding his stump from e-mail distance, and by Zonk's unwavering commitment to supplementing his care with organic meds. As their journey continues, B.D. and Boopsie are cared for by Fisher House, a home-next-door-to-the-hospital for families whose lives revolve around therapy. B.D. finds himself painfully engaged in building his future, one sadistically difficult physical therapy session at a time. "To Lash, Helga, and the Marquis!" toast the band of differently limbed brethren, raising their glasses to their PT masters as they prepare for reentry into the ambulatory world. From rebuilding tissue to rebuilding social skills to rebuilding lives, B.D's inspiring, insightful, and darkly humorous story confirms that it can take a village, or at least a ward, to raise a soldier when he's gone down. "Thank you for getting blown up," offers one of B.D.'s visiting players. Replies the coach, "Just doing my job." © 2012 G.B. Trudeau
→ more

$9.99
"Hilarious!" -- Jake Tapper, ABC News "Hilarious!" -- Karen Tumulty, TIME "Hilarious!" -- Erin Moriarity, CBS News In March of 2009, Doonesbury's intrepid journalist Roland Burton Hedley, III, opened a Twitter account and began to tweet. A lot. Four weeks later, a sampling of his 140-character missives was published in The New Yorker to great acclaim, and his posts were featured in a one-on-one "tweet-off" in the Columbia Journalism Review. Rushed into print, this groundbreaking volume is the first book-length Twitter collection by a single author. With dozens of Doonesbury strips and over 500 tweets, it presents the best of Hedley's work -- frontline micro-blogging from the self-anointed dean of Washington journotwits. Eight months into this project, author G.B. Trudeau can confirm that Twitter is a colossal sinkhole of time, but is gratified that he has found a way to monetize Roland's inane postings. (Follow Roland_Hedley.) When not writing comedy haiku on Twitter, Trudeau writes and draws the Pulitzer-prize-winning comic strip Doonesbury for 1100 newspapers worldwide, and lovingly curates his web presence at Doonesbury.com. He also hosts a milblog called The Sandbox. From the book: "Just spotted colleague Terry Moran in hall. Could wave, but easier to tweet. Hey, dude." 10:49 AM Mar 18th from Tweetdeck "Bumped into an old stalker of mine at Borders. She'd lost some weight and looked terrific, but I tweeted 911 anyway. Cops arrived from 3 states." 1:43 PM Mar7th from Blackberry "I refuse to apologize for making time for my kid's ball games, so I usually end up not going." 9:13 AM May 4th from web "Had close call watching MJ memorial service. They ended 'We are the World' before I could jimmy open my gun closet and blow my brains out." 12:33 PM Jul 7th from web "While speaking last night, someone threw panties on stage. Or boxers. Whatever. Times like that, always ask myself: What would The Boss do?" 5:13 PM Mar 12th from web "Kabul. Awakened by huge blast in hotel lobby. Suicide bomber blew up complimentary breakfast buffet. Off to find bagel." 3:14 PM Apr 8th from Tweetdeck "Accompanying HMMV patrol, used on-board computer to order Ab Rocket. And because I acted when I did, receiving second one absolutely free." 8:01 PM Apr 13th from Blackberry © 2012 G.B. Trudeau
→ more

$9.99
Readers and critics were wowed by G. B. Trudeau's epic masterpiece 40: A Doonesbury Retrospective, and they'll rejoice when they see this beautiful follow-up volume. Featuring an innovative format and an all-new collection of strips, Red Rascal's War is the first all-color Doonesbury book ever. Both Trudeau and his fans have followed Doonesbury's ever-expanding cast through four decades of cultural turbulence and change. With its arresting cover and rich interior, Red Rascal's War showcases the most recent additions to a body of work the New York Times admiringly refers to as "a sprawling masterwork." "[Trudeau is] Dickensian in his range of characters," writes Garry Wills in The New York Review of Books. "Trudeau has just kept improving, year after year, in part because he stays so close to changing events. . . . He has never been better than in the last six years." From the exploits of Afghan legend-in-chief Sorkh Razil to the pipe dreams of Malibu's top nanny Zonker Harris, and from the "no more chill pills" intervention by Obama's aides to the way-cool love of a headbanging war vet and his MIT-grad gal, Doonesbury marches wildly on. "What else is guaranteed to make you think, feel nostalgic, and laugh out loud at least once a page?" --Karen Holt, O Magazine © 2012 G.B. Trudeau
→ more

$9.99
Even challenging Dubya to a "pronunciation bee" can't save Uncle Duke's weird horse race for the White House. In the end, the former Ambassador passes out in a snow bank while the Cheney Administration kicks into high gear. Predictablistically, the new presidential syntax isn't the only thing that's tortured and strange. Take myvulture.com, an Internet company born and born-again, worth $1 million or $500, depending on whether you ask the CEO or his mother; or look at Joanie Caucus as the turnover in Washington casts her career into play, if not into midlife crisis; or consider J.J. and Zeke, whose pay-per-view, online wedding yields mucho buzz but zero bucks--just like the rest of the Net. Yes, it's a Dubya Dubya Dubya world. Doonesbury just downloads it. © 2012 G.B. Trudeau
→ more

$9.99
Signature Wound: Rocking TBI completes a trilogy of Doonesbury books that examines the impact of combat on American soldiers in Iraq. A twist of fate brings B. D. to the bedside of SFC Leo Deluca (a.k.a. Toggle), a young HUMV driver and headbanger whose love of ear-bleed battle music had sonically distracted him enough to get his vehicle blown up. Missing an eye and suffering from aphasia, Toggle fights to recover from traumatic brain injury (TBI), a journey of recovery that brings out the best in B. D., his former commander. Toggle's tattooed, metalhead mom initially has reservations about his improbable Facebook romance with an MIT tech-head named Alex, but love blooms. As this engaging story unfolds, Toggle finds himself drawn toward a career in the recording industry, undaunted by the limitations of the New Normal that now defines his life. Crafted with the same kind of insight, humor, and respect that prompted the Pentagon and the VA to host signings of the two previous books in the trilogy, Signature Wound is a perceptive and timely look at the contemporary soldier's experience. © 2012 G.B. Trudeau
→ more

$14.99
“In a class by itself.” —Jules Feiffer on Doonesbury This all-color volume celebrates the marriage of Alex and Toggle, an event which optimistically confirms that life, like Doonesbury, rolls on. Indeed, how remarkable that the strip has so embraced and occupied its era that three generations of one family have married within its panels. Gathering their kith and kin around them at Walden, the wise but wounded soldier-artist and the brilliant but insecure techhead make a promising team for the years ahead, well-rounded yet squared away. Doonesbury’s fifth decade finds the largest rep company in the history of comic strips fully and widely engaged. Like so many flesh-and-blood fellow citizens, key characters now struggle with dramatic career change and job stress. And the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan continue to reverberate through the lives of others, as the strip illuminates their experiences with an attentiveness unparalleled in popular culture. Amid the relentless unfolding of unexpected storylines, the strip’s second and third generation characters increasingly take center stage, and the youngest regular, Sam, comes of age—literally in the blink of an eye—as the newlyweds prepare to welcome twins. It never ends, and how lucky for readers. “Most comic strips run out of creative energy after their initial inspiration,” notes Garry Wills. “Trudeau has just kept improving, year after year.”
→ more

$9.99
[Trudeau ranks as] one of the foremost sociopolitical satirists of recent decades." While some in the Doonesbury universe seek office, others serve. Alex and her Seattle co-hordes devote their young, restless, and body-pierced Deaniac energy to hooking up "flash art" with politics. Half a world away in Iraq, a major bad boy from stateside devotes himself to liberating the city of Al Amok, ruling with a steady hand, a full glass, a devoted Chinese handler, and an economy based on looting. As fate would have it, B.D. finds himself heading upriver on an apocalyptic mission to terminate Al Duke with extreme prejudice, a story line so made-for-TV that B.D. feels compelled to bang out the screenplay on his laptop in real time. Fortunately for the man known to Honey as "sir," the media red-lights the hit, though car bombers quickly pick up the option and put the project back in play. In the homeland, a wartime president has the answer to almost all the questions ("9-11") but tries to shelve the still incomplete story of his own National Guard duty back in the daze. Mark and Zonk join the war against trash politics by offering a $10,000 reward for any witness who can collaborate the flightsuit-in-chief's account, but their efforts, alas, come to naught. Yes, it's a divided nation. On the west coast sexual assault charges accompany a rise to power, while back east they mandate a fall: Walden College's acting coach, Boopstein, lets accusations of way-personal fouls force her football team off the field. Sex parties for recruits? "Who knew we were that competitive?" marvels President King, ending Boopsie's gridiron apprenticeship with two little words: "You're fired." © 2012 G.B. Trudeau
→ more

$9.99
No rogue regime ever needed its evildoing professionally reframed more urgently than Greater Berzerkistan, whose president-for-life Trff Bmzklfrpz (pronounced "Ptklm") needs to spin a recent round of ethnic cleansing. Fortunately, the pariah state (and its 50-hole golf course, built overnight by Kurds and Jews) borders Iran, a fact that K Street uberlobbyist Duke is retained to parlay into a major U.S. arms package. Meanwhile, across town, the crumbling of the newspaper industry crushes Rick Redfern's hope of continuing employment. After 35 years at the Washington Post, he is ejected into the blogosphere, where his prose now battles it out with that of 1,186,783,465 rivals, including Roland Hedley, who takes the art of Twittering to a new self-reverential low. Truly, everyone in Doonesburyland is struggling to adapt. While white Washington insiders scramble to acquire some African American friends, longtime black conservative Clyde schemes to score Obama's Blackberry number, Clinton-era Dems are forced to attend the president-elect's "No Drama School," and Jimmy Thudpucker once again reboots his career--this time as a cell phone ring-tone artist. No one ever said change was pretty. © 2012 G.B. Trudeau
→ more

$9.99
Your compassionate portrayal of Lieutenant B.D.'s recovery and struggle . . . has touched our Warrior family and opened the eyes of the rest of the world to the physical, emotional, and personal challenges our soldiers face." The initial stages of B.D.'s recovery from losing a leg in Iraq were dramatically portrayed in The Long Road Home: One Step at a Time, but his healing journey was far from over. As this powerful sequel shows, the "war within" can be a long and lonely struggle, hardly the life of a "glamorous amputee" imagined by his daughter's jealous classmate. With his coaching job at Walden re-secured and the marathon PT sessions paying off, B.D.'s return to normalcy seems to be progressing well. But those who love him see alarming signs of trouble, namely anger and alcohol. First there's the punching of an MP. Then there's the daily breakfast of beer, a subject not open for discussion even with a best-intentioned friend like Mike Doonesbury. And "the screaming at night isn't very Christmassy," Boopsie notes. As B.D. admits to his doctor, "I'd rather sleep with my weapon than my wife! How messed up is that?" Messed up enough that our wounded warrior forces himself to begin circling the local Vet Center, where he is gently and skillfully reeled in by a remarkable counselor and fellow Vietnam Vet named Elias. Their sessions together form an extraordinary and moving chronicle of catharsis and coming-to-terms. The words "Welcome home, soldier," are powerful and transformative, and B.D. is fortunate in finally getting to a place where he can hear them. © 2012 G.B. Trudeau
→ more

$9.99
"I don't read Doonesbury. He glorifies drugs." --Former White House Press Secretary Marlin Fitzwater Welcome to the age of pivots. Two centuries after the Founding Fathers signed off on happiness, Zonker Harris and nephew Zipper pull up stakes and head west in hot pursuit. The dream? Setting up a major grow facility outside Boulder, Colorado, and becoming bajillionaire producers of "artisanal" marijuana. For Zonk, it's the crowning reset of a career that's ranged from babysitting to waiting tables. For Walden-grad Zip, it's a way to confront $600,000 in student loans. Elsewhere in Free Agent America, newlyweds Alex and Toggle are struggling. Twins Eli and Danny show up during their mother's MIT graduation, but a bad economy dries up lab grants, compelling the newly minted PhD to seek employment as a barista. Meanwhile, eternally blocked writer Jeff Redfern struggles to keep the Red Rascal legend-in-his-own-mind franchise alive, while aging music icon Jimmy T. endures by adapting to his industry's new normal: "I can make music on my schedule and release it directly to the fans." He's living in his car. G.B. Trudeau's Doonesbury is now in its fifth decade, and has chronicled American life through eight presidents, four generational cohorts, and innumerable paradigm shifts. His political sitcom Alpha House, starring John Goodman, is available on DVD and by streaming from Amazon Prime. For the record, Trudeau always inhaled back in the day. As President Obama once explained, "That was the point."
→ more

$9.99
In Welcome to the Nerd Farm!: A Doonesbury Book life comes full circle as another Doonesbury Gen Nexer heads for college. With Zipper way-too-deeply embedded at Walden (America's number-one safety school) Alex boldly opts for MIT, the nerdfarm, where 30-hour study binges are de rigueur. Daily 911 calls home and a sense of doom (Just get some duct tape, roll me up in my bedspread, and ship me home . . .) give way as Gal Doonesbury finds fellowship among the similarly exhausted: No nerd left behind, explains roomie Drew, as they co-brainstorm their way through finals. The indomitable Granny D struggles with a life change as well; the move from sunny Oklahoma to live with Mike and Kim in saturated, caffeinated Seattle leaves her distinctly unbuzzed. Then there's the on-air unraveling of Mark and Chase's marriage (I'm tired of living with a Nazi!), with Joanie handling the technicalities of dissolving a legally nonexistent union. Equally traumatic is Uncle Duke's change of status, emerging from a months-long stupor to find himself pulling down six figures as a K Street lobbyist-and reregistering as a Democrat. Also shifting kin groups is B.D., who reluctantly joins PTSD group therapy, where Dex, Kurt, and Jason call him on much-needed 'tude adjustments. But there are signs of improvement: I didn't explode! he exults, after finding Zipper living in his office. That homeless yet ebulliently overoptimistic undergrad is deeply smitten with Alex, but is dangerously far ahead of her--picking out their future tabloid nickname before she even knows they're an item. Understandably, her considerable attention is focused elsewhere--on surviving MIT's killer grind and on the Battle of the Bots, a high-tech smackdown where she unleashes Alfie, an impudent, high-end hoverbot. Bring it, techgirl. © 2012 G.B. Trudeau
→ more

$9.99
He tried to warn us. Ever since the release of the first Trump-for-President trial balloon in 1987, Doonesbury's Garry Trudeau has tirelessly tracked and highlighted the unsavory career of the most unqualified candidate to ever aspire to the White House. It's all there--the hilarious narcissism, the schoolyard bullying, the loathsome misogyny, the breathtaking ignorance; and a good portion of the Doonesbury cast has been tangled up in it. Join Duke, Honey, Earl, J.J., Mike, Mark, Roland, Boopsie, B.D., Sal, Alice, Elmont, Sid, Zonker, Sam, Bernie, Rev. Sloan, and even the Red Rascal as they cross storylines with the big, orange airhorn who's giving the GOP such fits. Garry Trudeau is the "sleazeball" "third-rate talent" who draws the "overrated" comic strip Doonesbury, which "very few people read." He lives in New York City with his wife Jane Pauley, who "has far more talent than he has."
→ more

$12.99
"As its title implies, In the Beginning There Was Chaos follows John and Elly Patterson as they tackle the everyday joys and sorrows--and surprises and frustrations and challenges--that arise when raising a young family. In her second For Better or For Worse treasury, Lynn Johnston takes readers back to the 1980s, when Elly leaves her column for a job at the library. As Elly chases her professional goals, she struggles with spending less time at home. Meanwhile, John provides consistent comic relief, as he plays Mr. Mom, breaks his foot with a 25-pound turkey, and gets arrested for trying to steal a potty. Of course, the kids are always in tow--Michael learning that with age comes responsibility and Elizabeth discovering the thrills of kindergarten. Combining strips from Johnston's fourth, fifth, and sixth cartoon collections--Just One More Hug, The Last Straw, and Keep the Home Fries Burning--In the Beginning There Was Chaos reflects Johnston's longstanding tradition of portraying family life with charm, humor, and honesty. Devoted fans will love reliving the Pattersons' younger years, and first-time readers will discover why this endearing foursome is North America's favorite funny page family. In the Beginning There Was Chaos includes Johnston's commentary on the inspiration behind strips, as well as photos and newspaper clippings from the early days, providing a behind-the-scenes glimpse for fans of For Better or For Worse. Join the Patterson family as they find humor in everyday life's challenges. Lynn Johnston was born in Collingwood, Ontario, and grew up in British Columbia. Today, she lives in Corbeil, Ontario. Johnston is the first woman to receive a Reuben Award for Cartoonist of the Year by the National Cartoonists Society in 1985. She has also received the Order of Canada and claims a star on Canada's Walk of Fame. For Better or For Worse has been syndicated since 1979 and was named Best Syndicated Comic Strip in 1992. For Better or For Worse appears in more than 2,000 newspapers in 23 countries, and is translated into 8 languages for a devoted readership of more than 220 million. The strip boasts a lively Web presence at www.fborfw.com."
→ more

$12.99
"As creator Lynn Johnston illustrates inside this special treasury of America's most popular family comic strip, For Better or For Worse, life moves quickly in the Patterson household. From car pools and coffee klatches to life lessons for all, Johnston combines strips from her fifth and sixth cartoon collections—Just One More Hug and The Last Straw—inside this specially annotated edition. Reflecting Johnston's longstanding tradition of portraying family life with warmth, humor, and honesty, this treasury features Johnston's original commentary, which offers firsthand insight into the development and inspiration behind her strips. Candid personal photos and newspaper clippings from the early days are also included and provide a behind-the-scenes glimpse for fans of For Better or For Worse. Join the Patterson family as they find humor in life's everyday challenges and triumphs; and discover why this endearing foursome is North America's favorite funny-page family inside this reflective retrospective."
→ more
51 - 100 of 176 results