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In the tradition of The Complete Far Side and The Complete Calvin and Hobbes, Dilbert 2.0 celebrates the 20th anniversary of Scott Adams's Dilbert, the touchstone of office humor. This fourth volume of the four-volume e-book edition of Dilbert 2.0 covers the modern era from 2001 to 2008 for the celebrated cartoon strip. DILBERT © 2012 by Scott Adams, Inc. All rights reserved. Licensed by Peanuts Worldwide, Inc.
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Inside Your Accomplishments Are Suspiciously Hard to Verify, Adams tackles the subjects of Elbonian slave labor, faulty product recalls, less-than-anonymous employee surveys, and more. If you've ever looked among your co-workers and thought, "I hope feral cats eat every one of you," or briefly celebrated a well-deserved promotion only to realize that the word "promotion" now means that you're responsible for doing two jobs for the price of one, then chances are you find the corporate cubicle culture represented inside Dilbert alive and well inside your own work environment--and that's exactly what makes Dilbert so topical and funny. From Dilbert's invention of a portable brain scanner (with a popcorn microwave option) to his moonlighting as a professional corporate crime scene cleaner, Your Accomplishments Are Suspiciously Hard to Verify chronicles pointless projects, interminable meetings, and ill-conceived office policies one Dilbert strip at a time. DILBERT © 2012 by Scott Adams, Inc. All rights reserved. Licensed by Peanuts Worldwide, Inc.
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No office can function without a little humor and craziness. Adams turns mundane office issues into excruciatingly funny office moments. In Freedom's Just Another Word for People Finding Out You're Useless, fans get a hilarious collection of great Dilbert strips that are anything but useless. From office politics and reams of red tape, to mayhem due to new technologies and, of course, the crazy cast of co-workers, Dilbert gets it done. DILBERT © 2012 by Scott Adams, Inc. All rights reserved. Licensed by Peanuts Worldwide, Inc.
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Read by 150 million fans in 39 countries, Dilbert concerns the exploits of a cynical engineer who tries to stay afloat in the turbulence that is corporate America in the 1990s. This latest collection of cartoons from the enormously popular strip is aimed at the insanity of the business world. Dilbert is the ultimate parody of corporate America. This latest collection finds our unlikely hero up to the uneven knot in his bent tie in the callow idiocy of (what else?) the business world. DILBERT © 2012 by Scott Adams, Inc. All rights reserved. Licensed by Peanuts Worldwide, Inc.
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What would the world of work be like without Dilbert? Downright insufferable! When it became syndicated in 1989, Dilbert struck a nerve with workers everywhere. Through its frames they saw life on the job as they knew it, with all the absurdity, craziness, and dry humor that underlies any living, breathing organization. The fact that the strip focused on a hapless engineer and his cynical dog just made it all the more funny. Now work life seems downright unimaginable without Dilbert and Dogbert's take on everything from management ill-practices to nonperformance reviews. What Would Wally Do?, delivers that same combination of pain and humor that readers count on. This collection especially highlights Wally, Dilbert's colleague, fellow engineer, foil, and fool. Wally's that short quirky guy with little hair, plenty of horn-rimmed frames, and almost zero work ethic. After all, who's got time for a job, thinks the self-proclaimed "Lord Wally the Puppet Master," when you're busy surviving the "Mobility Pool," turning your cubicle into a tourist attraction called "Sticky-Note City," and selecting a mail-order bride from Elbonia? Weasel-Boy makes a point of highlighting his poor performance and lack of respect . . .and usually gets another raise for his efforts. Such is life in Dilbert and Wally's world. Such are the laughs in What Would Wally Do? DILBERT © 2012 by Scott Adams, Inc. All rights reserved. Licensed by Peanuts Worldwide, Inc.
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Confined to their cubicles in a company run by idiot bosses, Dilbert and his white-collar colleagues make the dronelike world of Kafka seem congenial." -New York Times Why is Dilbert such a phenomenon? People see their own dreary, monotonous lives brought to comedic life in the ubiquitous strip. In the 23rd collection of Scott Adams' tremendously popular series, Don't Stand Where the Comet Is Assumed to Strike Oil, suppressed and repressed workers everywhere can follow the latest developments in the so-called careers of Dilbert, power-hungry Dogbert, Catbert, Ratbert, the pointy-haired boss, and other supporting-but don't you dare call them supportive-characters. Each "funny because it's true" scenario bears an uncanny, hysterical, and sometimes uncomfortable similarity to cubicle-filled corporate America.
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"My cube is sucking the life force out of me." --Dilbert In Cubes and Punishment: A Dilbert Book, Dilbert sardonically skewers the Dostoevskian sense of despair and anxiety that corporate life breeds. And nowhere is this sense more alive than in the desolation of the cubicle. In Dilbert's world, cubicle dwellers are relegated to everything from the half-size intern cubicle to the patented head cubicle and are even sentenced to adopt and decorate empty cubicles. Dilbert continues to be the voice for the embattled cubicle-dwelling Everyman. With best-friend Dogbert, and a veritable who's who in accompanying office characters ranging from the Boss and Wally to Alice and Catbert, Dilbert offers a welcome dose of laughter in response to the inanity of corporate culture and middle-management mores. DILBERT © 2012 by Scott Adams, Inc. All rights reserved. Licensed by Peanuts Worldwide, Inc.
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Anyone who works in a fabric-covered box can relate to Dilbert. Since 1989, Dilbert has been the touchstone of office humor for people all over the world. As long as there are corrupt businesses, inept bosses and downright loathsome co-workers, there is plenty to chuckle at. Convinced your co-worker is a demon? That your boss is incompetent? That your dog is out to get you? Dilbert believes you, and this book proves it. DILBERT © 2012 by Scott Adams, Inc. All rights reserved. Licensed by Peanuts Worldwide, Inc.
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Dilbert, the cubicle-dwelling drone, is at his satirical best with this new collection of cartoons. Dilbert has managed to keep up with technology like iPads and Twitter over the years, as well as advanced systems like the Disaster Preparedness Plan that has its followers eating the crumbs from their keyboards. It doesn't get any more sophisticated than that. It's an office code violation to be this good after so many years, but Dilbert keeps doing what he does best: passive-aggressively out-witting his superiors and exercising conflict avoidance. And he is so good. No wonder office drones and workforce automatons alike can't resist the cold embrace of Dilbert's workplace.
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As fresh a look at the inanity of office life as it brought to the comics pages when it first appeared in 1989, this 40th AMP Dilbert collection comically confirms to the working public that we all really know what's going on. Our devices might be more sophisticated, our software and apps might be more plentiful, but when it gets down to interactions between the worker bees and the clueless in-controls, discontent and sarcasm rule, as only Dilbert can proclaim.
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What do the arts of yoga, feng shui, and Irish dance have in common? They can't save you from a gnawing dissatisfaction with your job. Luckily, our favorite office cog has a few tricks up his sleeve. Armed with a wearable brain stimulator and ingestible nanorobots, Dilbert discovers how to outpace stress, boredom, and sitting-induced early death. He may be a cyborg with a fake personality, but meetings are more tolerable than ever
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Dilbert is the cubicle-bound star of the most photocopied, pinned-up, downloaded, faxed, and e-mailed comic strip in the world.As fresh a look at the inanity of office life as it brought to the comics pages when it first appeared in 1989, this new Dilbert collection comically confirms to the working public that we all really know what's going on. Our devices might be more sophisticated, our software and apps might be more plentiful, but when it gets down to interactions between the worker bees and the clueless in-controls, discontent and sarcasm rule, as only Dilbert can proclaim.
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When confronted by unjust systems of corporate domination, whenever and wherever they may be, Dilbert boldly . . . gets "re-accommodated." The legendary gang of coworkers is back for more unprofessional development, jargon freestyle, and elaborate work-avoidance schemes. Management fudges the line between stupidity and illegality. Promising new coffee warmer/phone charger technologies abound. And the circle of blame goes ever onward.In this fresh collection, Dilbert lampoons cubicle culture with strips that are sometimes recognizable, sometimes absurd—but always hilarious. 
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The boss. Everyone has one, and all of every boss's worst traits are embodied in The Boss in Dilbert. In I Sense a Coldness to Your Mentoring, the ongoing torture that The Boss wreaks on his helpless underlings is played out in full. From a total lack of mentoring skills to clueless budget requests and pointless, mind-numbing endless meetings, The Boss makes office life for Dilbert, Wally, Alice, and his secretary a living hell with cubicle walls.
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