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$9.99
Congressman John Lewis (GA-5) is an American icon, one of the key figures of the civil rights movement. His commitment to justice and nonviolence has taken him from an Alabama sharecropper's farm to the halls of Congress, from a segregated schoolroom to the 1963 March on Washington, and from receiving beatings from state troopers to receiving the Medal of Freedom from the first African-American president. Now, to share his remarkable story with new generations, Lewis presents March, a graphic novel trilogy, in collaboration with co-writer Andrew Aydin and New York Times best-selling artist Nate Powell (winner of the Eisner Award and LA Times Book Prize finalist for Swallow Me Whole). March is a vivid first-hand account of John Lewis' lifelong struggle for civil and human rights, meditating in the modern age on the distance traveled since the days of Jim Crow and segregation. Rooted in Lewis' personal story, it also reflects on the highs and lows of the broader civil rights movement. Book One spans John Lewis' youth in rural Alabama, his life-changing meeting with Martin Luther King, Jr., the birth of the Nashville Student Movement, and their battle to tear down segregation through nonviolent lunch counter sit-ins, building to a stunning climax on the steps of City Hall. Many years ago, John Lewis and other student activists drew inspiration from the 1958 comic book Martin Luther King and the Montgomery Story. Now, his own comics bring those days to life for a new audience, testifying to a movement whose echoes will be heard for generations.
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$3.99
Meh is a wordless picture book that shows one boy's journey through depression. The book begins in brightly coloured images and gradually illustrates the boy finding his way in a dark world. He finds his way out of the darkness by following light in the form of a bright cat that leads him into the colourful world again. Sadness is an emotion that everyone feels at some time or another. But sometimes you might feel a sadness so long and so deep and dark that it seems impossible to find happiness. That kind of sadness is called depression. Meh is a wordless book about one boy's journey through depression. Discussion questions at the back of the book are intended for parents or teachers to discuss depression with children.
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$9.99
The three Bone cousins — Fone Bone, Phoney Bone, and Smiley Bone — are separated and lost in a vast, uncharted desert. One by one, they find their way into a deep, forested valley filled with wonderful and terrifying creatures. Eventually, the cousins are reunited at a farmstead run by tough Gran’ma Ben and her spirited granddaughter. But little do the Bones know, there are dark forces conspiring against them, and their adventures are only just beginning!
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$4.99
The Complete Big Nate collects every daily and Sunday cartoon ever syndicated. Presented in a numbered series of e-books, each containing one year's worth of strips, this is a goldmine for all Big Nate fans to see many cartoons that have never been published in books. Aspiring cartoonist Nate Wright is the star of Big Nate. As a popular middle-grade book character, Nate is 11 years old, four-and-a-half feet tall, and the all-time record holder for detentions in school history. He's a self-described genius and sixth grade Renaissance Man. Nate, who lives with his dad and older sister, has a habit of annoying his family, friends, and teachers with his sarcasm.
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$7.99
Bridget and Carlton are as close as any sister and brother. But their relationship is particularly special. Carlton has autism and is almost completely nonverbal. He's smart, funny, creative, and loving. He has immense challenges in speaking full sentences.  Bridget's fierce loyalty to and compassion for her brother led to an unbreakable bond that has helped the siblings cope with divorce and homelessness. Carlton's devotion to his family is loud and clear, even in his silence. Carlton Hudgens was diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder at three years old. He didn't speak or interact with the world around him, except with humming and flapping arms. The diagnosis provided a label, but not an answer. He was considered low-functioning, but all that meant was that there was a laundry list of tasks he couldn't do, and little recognition of what he could. Carlton's sister, Bridget, just a year younger, became his protector, sharing their birthdays so that he could open the presents first, taking the blame for a broken toy to spare him from being punished on Christmas Day. She understood that she was living in Carlton's world, not the other way around. Because Carlton doesn't speak in full sentences, Bridget has opted to tell his story. "My brother is brilliant in every way," Bridget says. "He just doesn't speak like we speak." When Carlton was five years old, he uttered his first words: "I love you, Mom!" Bridget was elated. That sentence meant that he could hear her, that he could speak, and that she had a chance to reach her ultimate goal of bonding with her brother. Bridget was his protector, but Carlton became Bridget's savior. When Bridget was eleven years old, she and Carlton went to the public pool. Carlton was a natural swimmer, but Bridget couldn't swim at all. As the two played a game in the shallow end, they drifted closer to the deep end. Bridget panicked, swallowing water and crying for help. Carlton swam to her and pulled her to safety. No longer was he different, with special needs, or "that kid with autism." To Bridget, he was the big brother who had just saved her. Later on, he became a savior to others. Autism didn't stop him feeling compassion and love. It just made it harder for him to express those emotions. Their parents' divorce and the subsequent remarriage of their mother created a more stable life for Carlton, but Bridget had a hard time accepting the good changes. She had put herself second for so long, it was difficult to allow an adult to take over the care of her brother. By early adulthood, Bridget began to realize that the most fulfilling part of her life was forming a deeper connection with Carlton—an unbreakable bond that would shape brother and sister for the rest of their lives. It was Carlton's influence that led to her passion for helping others with special needs.
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$7.99
Click is the heroic story of a young girl who was terrorized by schoolmates with merciless online harassment and her brave effort to overcome her tormentors. Her powerful, compelling story is told in brilliant graphic novel form. Lexi's story of cyberbullying is a shocking depiction of young teenager's torment in the newfound world of online harassment. Lexi, from Northridge, California, is ganged up on by a few girls over a misunderstanding on the schoolyard.  The incident escalates on social media, local chat boards, and gossip sites.  Forced to change schools, Lexi gets her karmic revenge when she returns to her old school for a Winter Formal.  In a gesture of pure bravery, Lexi turns the tables on the "clique" by landing the boy at the dance and her picture in the yearbook
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$7.99
Dounya Awada is a 24-year-old, devout Muslim, happy, healthy, and very much alive. But just a few years before, she nearly starved to death. Her struggle began when she was six years old. Little Dounya wanted nothing less than to be perfect, like her mother. She pushed herself hard every day, excelling in schoolwork and at home. She had to be the cutest, prettiest, smartest girl in the room. The slightest hint of imperfection led to meltdowns and uncontrollable tantrums. Her parents loved her fiercely but were unable to understand what was happening to their little girl. Being perfect all the time was exhausting. In Dounya's culture, food is nearly synonymous with love. Food is nourishment, nourishment is love, love is life. Dounya began to eat to fill the growing need within her. She grew in size, eventually hitting over 200 pounds at just age 15. Food became her only friend. Her peers mocked her. She felt utterly alone. As is the case for someone with dysmorphia, Dounya's obsession with food did a turnabout, and she began rigorous exercising and dieting. But even a substantial weight loss didn't satisfy her. She looked in the mirror and still saw the fat girl she used to be. She began the ugly cycle of bingeing and purging, eventually hitting a low weight of just 73 pounds. Dounya's horrific struggle with eating disorders has led her to advocate for boys and girls facing the same hurdles with which she struggled. She is now studying clinical psychology, and hopes to open an eating and dysmorphia disorder facility in Las Vegas for boys and girls with her disorder. If her story helps just one person to recognize the beauty of their imperfection, then her pain will have been worthwhile. Zuiker Press is proud to publish stories about important current topics for kids and adolescents, written by their peers, that will help them cope with the challenges they face in today's troubled world. Imperfect: A Story of Body Image is the fourth in a series of graphic novels written by young adults for their peers.
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$7.99
Colorblind: A Story of Racism is the third in a series of graphic novels written by young adults for their peers. Johnathan Harris is fifteen, and lives in Long Beach, California, where he loves playing soccer with his friends, and listening to their favorite rapper, Snoop Dogg, a Long Beach native. His mom, dad, and three brothers are tight, but one of the most influential family members for Johnathan is his Uncle Russell, a convict in prison, serving fifteen years to life . . . Uncle Russell taught Johnathan from a very young age to see people from the perspective of their cultures, and not just their skin color. He imbued a pride of his ancestry and cautioned against letting hatred into his heart. But when Johnathan was just eight years old, something happened that filled him with fear and the very hatred that Uncle Russell had warned him about. What happened to Johnathan made him see that a dream of a colorless world was just that. A dream. That event shook him to his core. Anger grew inside him like a hot coal. Uncle Russell had told him to "throw it away or you will get burned," but Johnathan was young and frightened. He was having a hard time forgiving, much less forgetting. Colorblind is Johnathan's story of confronting his own racism and overcoming it. It is a story of hope and optimism that all, young and old, should heed. Zuiker Press is proud to publish stories about important current topics for kids and adolescents, written by their peers, that will help them cope with the challenges they face in today's troubled world.
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$10.99
The million-copy French series makes its English language debut! Meet two wonderful young girls who happen to be sisters-Marine, and her older sister Wendy. Both are full of personality and a strong sense of independence. So while they may love each other with all their hearts, it's not always easy for the two of them to be together. After all, when kids are still very young, age differences are much more meaningful. While Marine may want to hang out with her older sister, nothing could be more embarrassing for Wendy. See how despite all odds, they still manage to get through each day without killing each other... well, at least so far! In addition to the main story, this volume features great backup features including the "Guide to Sisters", Marine's journal entries and much more!
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$2.99
What will the new millennium hold? Will Mondays be eliminated? Will hairball hacking become an Olympic event? Find out as Garfield cranks up his crystal ball to make some preposterous predictions for a brave new millennium.
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