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$9.99
AAAA! That's the sound heard often from the the Fox siblings as only sister Paige discovers Quincy the iguana has eaten her homework, older brother Peter applies permanent marker on his face drawing a fake goatee, and younger brother and expert video gamer Jason loses to Paige. Throw in the AAAAs as mother Andy exclaims while dodging thrown balls in the house and backyard-grilling disaster dad Roger blows up another grill, and you have the perfect equation for a family that every kid can relate to. Including cartoons from previously published books, this kid-targeted book portrays a not so typical look at how a year unfolds in the Fox family.
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$4.99
When Brian Basset first created his strip, Adam, it had a Mr. Mom theme running through it. It was unusual at the time for a man to stay home while his wife played the corporate games-even if he was working-and Basset used the situation to its fullest comic potential. These days, however, home-based offices are increasingly common, and Basset finds he was merely leading a trend.That's one reason the creator of this charming cartoon changed the name of his strip last year to Adam@home. In this sixth collection, the one-time Mr. Mom focuses on a whole host of compatriots who hang out at the local coffee cafe, log in remotely, and compare work-at-home notes. In Cafe Adam, an all-new Adam@home collection, Basset mines the laughs in all sorts of home-office and coffee-house-based dramas, including keeping in good standing with the local barista (no jokes about the nose ring), dealing with client complaints by handing over the phone to a screaming infant son, and helping out his kids' class at school. He also revels in the little things, from changes the nearby Kopyko made for workers like himself to being able to attend an office Christmas party, even if it's virtual.Through it all, Adam's wife, Laura, who still has to show up for her job at a local bookstore, and his kids, Katy, Clayton, and Nick, help the Newman household retain its balance. An engaging family, the Newmans have become an essential source of amusement for Basset's countless fans.
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$9.99
While the Granville family dutifully entertain their guests at Devonton Abbey, an ace team of Secret Service agents camp out as unsuspecting household staff, protecting the Royal Crown and her citizens from impending world war.
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$9.99
"Insightful and venomously cynical political cartoons . . . Rall straddles stereotypes, avoids party lines like live wires. . . . A true freethinker." --Las Vegas Mercury There simply isn't a more polarizing, more controversial, or more widely read political and social cartoonist than Ted Rall. Matt Groening: "Ted Rall makes me laugh out loud." Rush Limbaugh: "What is sad is that such an ignoramus ends up as a prominent cartoonist in major newspapers." Janet Clayton, L.A. Times editorial page editor: "He's wonderfully incisive. He has a way of looking at the world that is rarely articulated in editorial cartoons." Bernard Goldberg, author of 100 People Who Are Screwing Up America: "There is loathsome and there is beneath loathsome. And then there's Ted Rall." Love him or hate him, Rall has a unique drawing style and makes caustic social commentary that sets him apart from the pack. America Gone Wild features Rall's most controversial cartoons assembled for the first time in a single collection. Rall views his strips as a vehicle for driving social change. He applies his outrageous sense of humor to volatile topics from 9/11 and the Iraq war to social issues such as unemployment, the environment, and religion. This collection comprises his edgiest material and features lengthy behind-the-scenes commentary from Rall.
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$9.99
Scott Hilburn's The Argyle Sweater boasts a readership ranging from the Washington Post and the Los Angeles Times to the Calgary Herald, and more than 1 million Argyle Sweater greeting cards have been sold. Inside Hilburn's colorful cartoon panel, oversized animals, malevolent Care Bears, and an unstable Hamburger Helper cavort with bees, wolves, zebras, cavemen, mad scientists, and nursery-rhyme and funny-page icons to offer a critique of society and popular culture. Captured with Hilburn's visceral talent and bold pen stroke, The Argyle Sweater is a celebrated visual and cerebrally astute panel fueled by thoughtful imagination and a skewered attention to detail.
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$9.99
The Argyle Sweater is a comic for grown-ups but it's inspired by a childlike imagination and charm. Follow bears, bees, chickens, wolves, dogs, cats, zebras, cops, game shows, phones, cavemen, and even nursery rhyme icons and an evil scientist, into the mischief and perfect-fitting dialogue of The Argyle Sweater world. Hilburn jokes he thought about naming the strip For Better or For Worse but noted "that that one was already taken."
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$9.99
The Argyle Sweater is a comic for grown-ups but it's inspired by a childlike imagination and charm. Follow bears, bees, chickens, wolves, dogs, cats, zebras, cops, game shows, phones, cavemen, and even nursery rhyme icons and an evil scientist, into the mischief and perfect-fitting dialogue of The Argyle Sweater world. Hilburn jokes he thought about naming the strip For Better or For Worse but noted "that that one was already taken."
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$9.99
With more than 1 million greeting cards sold, Scott Hilburn's The Argyle Sweater dresses up the funny page with an argyle-wearing assortment of cavemen, bears, moths, and pompadour-styled humans, along with an occasional evil scientist. Boasting a readership ranging from the Washington Post and the Los Angeles Times to the Calgary Herald, The Argyle Sweater fuses Hilburn's visceral talent and bold pen stroke. What results is a cerebrally astute cartoon panel that comments on popular culture, human nature, and society in a clever and spontaneous way.
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$7.99
With more than one million greeting cards sold, Scott Hilburn's The Argyle Sweater dresses-up the funny page with an argyle-wearing assortment of cavemen, bears, moths, and pompadour-having humans, along with an occasional evil scientist. Boasting a readership ranging from The Washington Post and the Los Angeles Times to the Calgary Herald, Hilburn's colorful cartoon panel fuses his visceral talent and bold pen stroke. What results is a cerebrally astute cartoon panel that comments on popular culture, human nature, and sporks in a clever, spontaneously rich way.
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$9.99
Now in an annual, treasury-sized book, Baby Blues brings you another year of life with the MacPhersons. Often-befuddled Darryl and always-overworked Wanda manage to parent precocious Zoe, ornery Hammie, and Baby Wren while still keeping their senses of humor and sometimes even sweetness. In this collection, Zoe decides it's time for her to take karate lessons, Wanda declares she needs some time for herself and joins a book (wine?) club, and Hammie discovers the joys of a zip line. Mostly calm Wanda finally reaches her breaking point of asking the kids to clean up, unleashing a new force of nature to the comic strip: the Tsumommy!
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